Forest Tenure

Responsible forest governance and secure forest rights are needed to reduce deforestation, combat climate change, and sustain the planet.

Responsible forest governance and forest tenure security are crucial in helping to reduce deforestation, combat climate change, and sustain the planet.

Forests are sources of multiple products and services of importance to a wide array of stakeholders, from local communities to urban citizens. In addition to contributing to human wellbeing and livelihoods, forests are important for people’s spiritual and cultural traditions. For many of the world’s poor, land and forests are important economic, social and cultural assets. In large parts of the world, however, local people’s use and ownership rights to resources are insecure, which undermines not only their livelihoods and sustainable resource management but also many development outcomes, such as biodiversity conservation, poverty reduction, improved food security and climate change mitigation.

Forest tenure and property rights determine who owns and manages forest resources. Forest tenure often is very complex, as there is an array of stakeholders with different interests to forests, such as the national and local state officials, the local users, local communities and Indigenous Peoples and seasonal users. Part of this complexity can be traced back to the colonial times, when many natural resources were taken over by the state while the rights of local resource users were unrecognized.  State control and management of land and forests persists in many areas today, yet these resources are claimed and managed by indigenous and local communities who base their tenure claims on community-based, customary rights that are commonly unacknowledged by states. Overlapping tenure rights often result from the co-existence of competing laws that emanate from the state and from communities.   The presence of multiple groups with overlapping and simultaneous tenure claims contributes to resource conflicts. In many countries, conflicts related to tenure and property rights are so grave that they result in social conflicts and violence, as well as environmental destruction.  

 

A stylized presentation of the bundles of rights

A stylized presentation of the bundles of rights (Courtesy of CAPRi)

 

Disclaimer: The data displayed on the Land Portal is provided by third parties indicated as the data source or as the data provider. The Land Portal team is constantly working to ensure the highest possible standard of data quality and accuracy, yet the data is by its nature approximate and will contain some inaccuracies. The data may contain errors introduced by the data provider(s) and/or by the Land Portal team. In addition, this page allows you to compare data from different sources, but not all indicators are necessarily statistically comparable. The Land Portal Foundation (A) expressly disclaims the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any data and (B) shall not be liable for any errors, omissions or other defects in, delays or interruptions in such data, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Neither the Land Portal Foundation nor any of its data providers will be liable for any damages relating to your use of the data provided herein.

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    Media

    Latest News

    12 October 2017
    Global

    Rome—Considerable gains have been made in land-tenure governance in the past five years, but more must be done to improve the lives of billions of people—that was the message at a high-level event cohosted by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the European Union (EU) to mark the fifth anniversary of guidelines to recognize and secure tenure rights.

    12 October 2017
    Latin America and the Caribbean

    STOCKHOLM (IDN) – Indigenous peoples are all but invisible on the development agenda but a hoped for change is on the cards with the launch of the world’s first and only funding institution to support the efforts of local and native communities to secure rights over their lands and resources.

    8 October 2017
    Global
    • A new $100 million initiative will help indigenous peoples and local communities in rural areas secure rights to their traditional lands.
    • The International Land and Forest Tenure Facility, formally launched launched week, was conceived by the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI)
    • The Tenure Facility is a mechanism for scaling up recognition of rights to collective lands and forests.
    • The tenure facility aims to secure at least 40 million hectares of forests and rural lands for local and indigenous communities.
    4 October 2017
    Global

    How can food companies stop contributing to deforestation? A panel of experts discussed solutions at a roundtable in New York

    Latest Blogs

    United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
    Global

    By Professor Jeffrey Sachs, Chairman of the Advisory Board of CCSI, University Professor at Columbia University, and Director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network

    Goats getting ready for milking in the Khovd Province of Mongolia. Photo credit: © Eddie Game / The Nature Conservancy
    Global
    Mongolia
    Indonesia
    Australia

     

    By Yuta Masuda and Brian E. Robinson

    I’m sitting in a Mongolian yurt, listening to and trying to emulate Bataa’s* songs about love for the grasslands and the wide, treeless plains of the Mongolian Plateau. Our host sings with consuming passion. I might have brushed his enthusiasm off as a show two weeks ago. But after living and working in these grasslands, the feeling of freedom that comes from unobstructed, far-off distant horizon is infectious.

    South America
    Brazil

       |   19 .07. 2017   |   LINDSAY BIGDA, RRI COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER

    In Brazil, indigenous and Afro-descendant communities face unprecedented threats to their hard-won territorial and constitutional rights.

    Latest Events

    14 November 2017 to 17 November 2017

    Location

    Addis Ababa
    Ethiopia
    ET
    Africa
    Ethiopia
    The Africa We Want: Achieving socioeconomic transformation through inclusive and equitable access to land by the youth
     
    TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2017 TO FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2017
     
    Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
    11 October 2017 to 14 October 2017

    Location

    Viana do Castelo
    United States
    US
    Portugal

    Desde a sua fundação, em 1984, a Sociedade Portuguesa de Ciências Florestais tem vindo a desenvolver diversas actividades no sentido de fomentar o estudo e progresso da ciência e da técnica florestal entre as quais se destaca a organização dos Congressos Florestais Nacionais.

    Walk for land rights, Chambal, India, 2009.
    4 October 2017 to 5 October 2017

    Location

    Stockholm
    Sweden
    SE
    Global

    Join us for the 3rd international conference on scaling-up global efforts to secure community land and resource rights.

    In 2013, leading Indigenous Peoples, community organizations, NGOs, governments, private companies, and investors met in Interlaken to devise strategies to scale up global efforts to secure community land and resource rights. Last September, we met in Bern to assess and establish a new baseline from which to measure global progress.

    10 July 2017 to 14 July 2017

    Location

    Utrecht
    Netherlands
    NL
    Global

    Welcome to IASC’s XVIth Biennial Conference in Utrecht in 2017! The ‘Institutions for Collective Action’ research team of Utrecht University as well as the researchers affiliated with Utrecht University’sStrategic Theme ‘Institutions for Open Societies’ are proud to jointly host the global XVI Biennial Conference, ‘Practicing the commons: Self-governance, cooperation, and institutional change’ of The International Association for the Study of the Commons (IASC) in the historical city centre of Utrecht, 10-14 July 2017.

    Partners

    Library

    Displaying 1 - 6 of 3504
    Reports & Research
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    December 2017
    Indonesia
    Eastern Asia
    Oceania

    Since the early 1990s, the industrial timber plantation (Hutan Tanaman Industri - HTI) scheme has been intended to serve as a major source of timber to meet domestic and export demand. The need to meet a large gap between legal wood supply and demand for forests products has been the recent years as high as 50 million

    Reports & Research
    September 2017
    Mozambique

    Mozambique is Africa’s largest exporter of timber to China. Yet multiple published concerns over the sustainability and legality of that timber trade assert the rapid commercial depletion of future timber stocks, the marginalisation of local forest communities, and the loss of revenue to government estimated at US$146 million between 2007 and 2013 alone.

    Moving from information dissemination to community participation in forest landscapes cover image
    Reports & Research
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    August 2017
    Asia

    Traditionally, in the context of environment and natural resources management, many communication efforts have focused on the dissemination of technical information to end-users who were expected to adopt them. Development practitioners were trying to ‘push’ their products on communities in order to receive community commitment to their development initiatives.

    Peer-reviewed publication
    July 2017
    Laos

    Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR) has been experiencing significant forest depletion since the 1980s, but there is little evidence to demonstrate the major causes and underlying drivers for the forest cover changes. In this study, we investigated the relationship between forest cover decrease and increase in the south of Lao PDR between 2006 and 2012 and selected physical and socio-economic factors.

    Peer-reviewed publication
    July 2017

    Community-managed reserves (CMRs) comprise the fastest-growing category of protected areas throughout the tropics. CMRs represent a compromise between advocates of nature conservation and advocates of human development. We ask whether CMRs succeed in achieving the goals of either. A fixed reserve area can produce only a finite resource supply, whereas human populations exploiting them tend to expand rapidly while adopting high-impact technologies to satisfy rising aspirations. Intentions behind the establishment of CMRs may be admirable, but represent an ideal rarely achieved.